Timber Studs as Thermal Bridges

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griffincherrill
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Joined: Mon Aug 31, 2020 2:23 pm -1100

Timber Studs as Thermal Bridges

Post by griffincherrill » Mon Aug 31, 2020 5:42 pm -1100

Hi there,

I am currently writing my thesis for my masters and I am using WUFI Plus to assess the risk of surface condensation in timber-framed houses from thermal bridges. Currently, my understanding is that there are two ways to add thermal bridges into the simulation. The first is to enter the heat loss through the Linear Thermal Bridges tab for each zone, and the second is to model them in the 3D Objects tab for a certain section of the building. The first option only considers the effect of thermal bridges on the overall heat loss and therefore energy consumption, while the second makes it possible to identify whether surface condensation may occur.
I was hoping to use WUFI Plus to create heterogeneous constructions made up from an insulation layer with repeated timber studs, which can be done in the Passive House Verification Scope. That way it can consider each stud in the building element without having to model all the framing in the 3D Objects. But it seems the only method to do this in WUFI Plus is to create a homogeneous layer with a reduced R-value from the timber framing, which would assume heat flow is 1-dimensional.
Part of the reason I am exploring the effect of thermal bridges on the risk of condensation is because New Zealand Standard 3604 details that trimming studs can be up to 270mm thick, which could have a significant impact on the risk of condensation. But I am not sure how to assess the effect of local surface temperature surrounding larger thermal bridges if the R-value is consistent across the wall.
I am wondering if I am correct in assuming there is no way to add systematic thermal bridges into the simulation, without having to model each one in the 3D Objects. If this is the case, what is the best practice when modelling a timber-framed wall which would give an idea about the risk of condensation.

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